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Gambled Australian elections, Again?

This is one of the most detailed Australian elections in a decade. Votes were cast for 76 upper house seats and 150 lower house seats. It is basically the first time in years that voters voted for both houses in a single election.

Ever since Julia Gillard deposed her Labor colleague, Kevin Rudd, Australia has faced unstable government. Mr. Rudd was in his first term as the PM in 2010.

Ms Gillard couldn’t win the trust of the electors and Labor party opted to bring back Kevin Rudd. The Liberal party, under Tony Abbott, took over the premiership in 2013 and was later dispatched by PM Turnbull in an internal party coup.

Mr. Turnbull came in with the promise of ending the election instability. But just like Ms Gillard, he faces a term in minority government. This is an environment where a single mistake is magnified; while the by-elections are marred with fraught.

A bus driven by minor parties and independent candidates

ballot-1294935_1280Nick Xenophon Team won the lower house South Australian seat of Mayo. This once used to be Liberal safe seat. Xenophon may come back to the Senate while his party is confident of some few upper house seats.

On the other hand, One Nation has a strong poll in Queensland. As much as it hasn’t won a lower house seat, preferences have tendered the party into the opposition Labor.

Ms Hanson is likely to bag in two spots in the Senate.

Cathy McGowan, Andrew Wilkie, Bob Katter and Greens MP Adam Bandt were all returned to the lower house.

Australians are regarded as the world’s biggest gamblers

But after Brexit, are there lessons for them to learn? Can they put aside all that and focus on a directly elected PM?

The minor party factor seems to produce echoes from all over. Just like everywhere else, Australians are not happy with the mainstream politics.

The Nick Xenophon Team and Ms Hanson’s One Nation stand for economic protectionism. But Hanson’s views on anti-migration have not mellowed her.

Bill Shorten, the Labor leader, believes that the close contest is a vindication of his policies. But there may be a fundamental shift Australia’s politics. You may want to consider the Leave vote for EU. Alternatively, the Donald trump rise in US politics can also be an indicator.

Lost focus in Australian elections

Mr Shorten and Mr Turnbull have engaged in a war of words, as the close tie became apparent. The PM accuses the opposition for scaring voters over Medicare.

Shorten says that the government will privatise Medicare, allegations that Turnbull refutes. He said that these are “some of the most systematic, well-funded lies ever peddled in Australia.”  But the opposition leader couldn’t keep quiet over the matter.

“He will never again be able to promise the stability which he has completely failed to deliver tonight,” said Shorten.

Many questions surround the two leaders.

Mr. Turnbull has already been called upon to resign At one time he toppled his party’s right wing. On the other hand, Mr. Shorten is faced with allegations of fraudulent distribution of text messages.

Continue reading more about Australia elections

Australian Prime Minister: Re-elect Us To Counter Brexit

Six key issues in Australia election campaign

Australia votes 2016: Two Horse Race

 

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