Kate Summerscale’s Top 10 Popular and Famous Quotes

Ten of My Favourite Kate Summerscale Quotes 

Love reading? Then it’s likely you will love a good quote from your favourite author. This article covers Kate Summerscale’s Top 10 Popular and Famous Quotes that we at Australia Unwrapped have collected from some of his greatest works. Kate Summerscale quotes to remember and here you will find 10 of the best. A memorable quote can stay with you and can be used along your journey. Choosing Kate Summerscale’s top 10 quotes is not easy, but here they are:

Popular Quotes

“Like Frankenstein, I am afraid of the monster I have called into existence.”
― Kate Summerscale

 “In June it took part in an elaborately planned action at Messines Ridge, in Belgian Flanders, which opened with the Allies detonating a million pounds of explosives next to the German trenches, instantly killing 10,000 enemy soldiers. The blast was heard in London and felt across southern England. In the fighting that ensued, Bill Alabaster led the parties carrying grenades, ammunition and water from the 45th Battalion headquarters to the troops at the front line, across open ground raked by artillery and machine-gun fire. Herring recommended him for the Military Medal. The 45th lost seven officers and 344 other ranks over four days of combat.”
― Kate Summerscale, The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

“Nothing can be more slightly defined than the line of demarcation between sanity and insanity … Make the definition too narrow, it becomes meaningless; make it too wide, and the whole human race becomes involved in the dragnet. In strictness we are all mad when we give way to passion, to prejudice, to vice, to vanity; but if all the passionate, prejudiced and vain people were to be locked up as lunatics, who is to keep the key to the asylum?”

(Editorial, The Times, 22 July 1853)”
― Kate Summerscale, The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective

 “Perhaps this is the purpose of detective investigations, real and fictional — to transform sensation, horror and grief into a puzzle, and then to solve the puzzle, to make it go away. ‘The detective story,’ observed Raymond Chandler in 1949, ‘is a tragedy with a happy ending.’ A storybook detective starts by confronting us with a murder and ends by absolving us of it. He clears us of guilt. He relieves us of uncertainty. He removes us from the presence of death.”
― Kate Summerscale, The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective

 “Inquest juries frequently linked suicide to cheap literature. When a twelve-year-old servant boy hanged himself in Brighton in 1892, the jury delivered a verdict of ‘suicide during temporary insanity, induced by reading trashy novels’. When a twenty-one-year-old farm labourer in Warwickshire shot himself in the head in 1894, the coroner suggested that the fifty penny dreadfuls found in his room had had ‘an unhinging and mesmeric effect’ upon his mind.”
― Kate Summerscale, The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

 “fifteen-year-old from Shepherd’s Bush, West London, who had poisoned himself with carbolic acid. His father had given him a ‘good hiding’, the paper reported, because he had been out of work for a month. The boy left a note reading ‘I wish you to know the reason I did it is because I could not work’, but the judge none the less ascribed his death to his consumption of ‘literary offal’.”
― Kate Summerscale, The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

“adjournment of Emily Coombes’s inquest, the coroner dealt with the death of yet another Peculiar child who had not been attended by a doctor. Lewis berated the parents, saying that he was sure that they would have called in help if their pig or donkey had fallen ill. The parents did not disagree. They simply pointed out that the Bible said nothing about animals.”
― Kate Summerscale, The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

 “The word ‘clue’ derives from ‘clew’, meaning a ball of thread or yarn. It had come to mean ‘that which points the way’ because of the Greek myth in which Theseus uses a ball of yarn, given to him by Ariadne, to find his way out of the Minotaur’s labyrinth.”
― Kate Summerscale, The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective

“In every other age and class man is held responsible for his reading, and not reading responsible for man. The books a man or woman reads are less the making of character than the expression of it.”
― Kate Summerscale, The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

“I think people marry far too much, it is such a lottery after all, and to a poor woman very doubtful happiness.”
― Kate Summerscale, Mrs. Robinson’s Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady

10 Famous Quotes by Author Kate Summerscale

10 quotes by Kate Summerscale there you go! It’s never an easy task picking the best quotations from great writers, so please if you disagree or have more to add, please comment and share your opinions. My 10 greatest Kate Summerscale quotes will likely be different from yours; however, that’s the best thing about them, each quote can mean something different to each person. So don’t wait, comment and shares your best Kate Summerscale Quote. 

One Final Bonus – Kate Summerscale Quote 

“Charles Lewis had investigated the deaths from diphtheria of several children whose parents were Peculiar People, members of a Wesleyan sect formed in Essex in 1838. In accordance with their interpretation of a passage in St James’s Epistle, the parents had not called a doctor when their children fell ill, and instead tried to cure them through prayer and the anointment of oil. The Children’s Act of 1889 enabled the state to prosecute a parent for the ill-treatment or culpable neglect of a child, and an amendment of 1894 specified that failure to obtain medical help could be an offence. Yet all that the coroner’s court was able to do in the Peculiar People cases was give a verdict of death from natural causes – it was hard to prove that a death from diphtheria could have been prevented or even delayed by medical intervention. Lewis announced that he was ‘sick and tired’ of having these cases reported to him when he was powerless to act, and demanded that the law be tightened up. When a Peculiar father explained to him, ‘I stand up for the Lord’, Lewis returned: ‘You can lie [down] and die, if you like, but it is cowardly, most cowardly, to allow helpless children to do so.”

― Kate Summerscale, The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer

Dave Peterson

Dave Peterson Passion for adventure and sharing his life long journey with as many others as possible. "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." HENRY S. HASKINS

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