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BrExit Referendum – The Highest Turnout Since The 90’s

Did you know that two days ago you witnessed the highest turnout in a UK-wide vote since the 1992 general election?

On Thursday June 23rd, a referendum was held to decide whether the United Kingdom should LEAVE or REMAIN in the European Union. BrExit is an abbreviation which stands for Britain Exiting the EU.

In this series of articles we will be discussing the BeExit idea; what is it? Why is it such a good idea? Why the BrExit now? What political and economic impacts the BrExit might have on the UK and much more. Stay tuned.

In the first article of the series, we will be talking about the BrExit referendum and why people in Britain voted for the BrExit.

BrExit Referendum – Statistics

Here are some statistics about the referendum;

BrExit Referendum - Statistics

The total number of votes has reached 33,551,983 votes.

Total number for Leave = 17,410,742 Votes (51.9%)

Total number for Remain = 16,141,241 Votes (48.1%)

As you can see, not everyone has voted for the BrExit and we will be sharing the two perspectives, to some degree, on subsequent articles.

The below chart illustrates the breakdown across the UK:

BrExit Referendum - Statistics Breakdown

The above chart sheds some light on a major problem with the BrExit referendum result which we hope will be dealt with as quickly and efficiently as possible to contain its negative impact.

Scotland, London and Northern Ireland, as shown above, all backed staying in the EU and voted against the BrExit. Scotland backed Remain by 62% to 38% and London backed Remain by 59.9% and 40.1% Leave while 55.8% in Northern Ireland voted Remain and 44.2% Leave. When you see these numbers it becomes no surprise to hear the following headlines in the news:

  • Scotland is moving for independence
  • Anti-Brexit protests break out on London streets after petition demanding a SECOND referendum hits 1.5million names in a day
  • Calls for a united Ireland
BrExit Referendum – Some Good News
  • As a homeowner: Due to the fall in immigration numbers once he UK leaves the EU, the house prices are expected to go down exponentially, which means that they will be much affordable than today. Your mortgage payments could also come down because the central bank may be forced to cut interest rates even further.
  • For tourists: It’s now cheaper to visit the UK than it has been for decades which might have a good impact on the economy. America is said to move to the first spot of the top ten countries sending tourists to the UK.
  • Education: A Brexit might save the UK government some money because it wouldn’t have to provide assistance to EU students since they used to be considered domestic students.
  • EU Citizens: Brexit leaders have suggested that EU citizens already in Britain would be given permission to stay in the country indefinitely.
  • Non-EU immigrants: Interest in immigration from outside the EU is significant now.
  • The British Expat: The 1.5 million of them in EU countries should not be afraid of becoming illegal immigrants. The Vienna Convention of 1969 says that the people’s rights, obligations and legal situations are protected when a treaty ceases, as long as those rights were acquired while a treaty was valid.
  • No more nightmares from Brussels to British sovereignty.
  • Immigration Policy: EU membership allowed citizens from the other 27 countries to move to Britain and look for work without a concrete job offer. EU Parliament member from the UK Daniel Hannan: “Outside the EU, we can control our immigration policy. More passports are checked at Britain’s borders than at those of the other 27 EU states put together.
  • Bureaucracy: As former London Mayor Boris Johnson says, “Sometimes these EU rules sound simply ludicrous, like the rule that you can’t recycle a teabag, or that children under eight cannot blow up balloons, or the limits on the power of vacuum cleaners.
  • Business: Lord Bamford, chairman of JCB, “An EU exit would allow the UK to negotiate trade deals as our country “rather than being one of 28 nations”.

Finally, the people who vote for the BrExit simple refused to sacrifice sovereignty for supposed prosperity.

BrExit Referendum – What’s Next?

The first thing we should do is to stay strong to make sure the government carries out what people have wished for; the BrExit.

Officially speaking, the starting point is for the UK to invoke an agreement called Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Once the government invokes it, this will give the UK two years to negotiate its withdrawal. One thing worth mentioning here is the fact that the article has only been in force since late 2009 and it hasn’t been tested yet, so no-one really knows how the Brexit process will work, according to BBC legal correspondent Clive Coleman.

BrExit Referendum – Questions To Reflect On

Depending on the kind of deal the UK agrees with the EU after exit, the following questions will be answered;

  • What happens to UK citizens working in the EU?
  • Will Britons need a visa to travel to the EU?
  • What about EU nationals who want to work in the UK?
  • Could we still remain in the single market?

Other questions might arise that need answer, which we have highlighted above, include;

  • What does this mean for Scotland?
  • What does it mean for Northern Ireland?
  • How will pensions, savings, investments and mortgages be affected?
  • Will our EHIC cards still be valid?
  • Will the UK be able to rejoin the EU in the future?
BrExit Referendum – A Second Referendum

I will leave this part to our readers by asking them this simple question;

How likely a second referendum will take place regarding the BrExit?

Your feedback and participation is highly appreciated.

Australia-Unwrapped Team

Take time to read the journey to BrExit

Britain is open for Business – Peasants Revolt
Exit Polls EU Referendum to close to call
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